Archive for April, 2013

The Ideal Modern Kitchen [1945]

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While now it may look like the backup kitchen at a big city church built in the 1930s, this Ideal Modern Kitchen from The Lily Wallace New American Cook Book would have been the bee’s knees in its day.  Check out the mural; do you have a mural along the ceiling in your kitchen? How about the big hanging lights which are designed to take 200-watt bulbs that sweat blistering heat from 10 feet up? Rounded corners on the cabinets? I want those now. 

Truthfully I’d cook here; a perfect upgrade – aside from the electrical system – would be stainless steel appliances.  And I’d keep the mural 🙂

Dental Health Week! [1977]

Elgin County Ontario celebrated Dental Health Week starting April 23, 1977 – by launching a ginormous toothbrush into their fantastic wood paneling. The smiles, the haircuts, and the horn-rimmed glasses say it all: They’re using Ultra-Brite!

Fashion Ahoy!! [1974]

Fashion Ahoy!! [1974] #sailfish #dress #florida #style #fashion #oldgoldfiltered #filmisnotdead

There is no end to the gems which unearth themselves from the Florida archives!

As it always seems to be, this 1974 fashion shot from Roy Erickson caught my eye as I was searching for something else.  That is one happy Sailfish, with small waves below it to soften its massive leap across her skirt.  The material in her dress appears to be identical to some of the shirts I wore during Junior High – slick, shiny and snaggy.  I’m sure there’s a name for it, but the word escapes me right now.

We can just call it “Disco Denim.”

Dear Kids of Today: We Didn’t Always have Smartphones

Journalist Lucy Morgan shows us how we documented the world around us in 1985, with her video tape camera and analog brick phone!

Now an iPhone or Android device does everything she is doing here, and then some. Granted, Morgan was a reporter using professional equipment, but you get the idea.

Wicked Street Machines of The 1970s

streetmachines

If you’re a gear head like me, you can’t get cars out of the blood.

For me the most notable “period of influence” for anything automotive was the 1970s; it was when I started building models.  It was when I started drawing customs.  It was when I bought my first car.  I am still in love with the long lines and thirsty engines that once pounded the streets of Seattle – announced with Cherry Bombs or Sidepipes and rolling on mags with back ends jacked up to the sky.

It would take years of therapy to strip that image from my mind, so I don’t even try.

Recently on Tumblr I came across a blog that celebrates that era through personal photos submitted by its readers.  70sStreetMachines is an archive of custom awesomeness, with the stripes, the paint, the spoilers, and the wheels which point to a decade of driving where America lived by “Anything Goes.”  There is no short trip to this blog!  I found myself stuck in a loop of viewing picture after picture, remembering what it was like to be 12 to 14 years old and wishing I was old enough to own effectively anything there.

Visit and Enjoy!

http://70sstreetmachines.tumblr.com/

Remembering Fotomat on Our Nostalgic Memories Blog

fotomat

Courtesy of Our Nostalgic Memories

Came across this blog post today while checking in on Google+. It is a detailed history of Fotomat, which started in 1965 and only closed completely in 2009. To be honest I didn’t realize it lasted that long!

I used Fotomat services in the 1980s, dropping off at my local kiosk in Shoreline WA.  I still have a few packs of negatives in Fotomat containers today.  Even some Kodachrome slides which were sent out for develop and mount.  In my neck of the woods, many of the remaining kiosks were repurposed as espresso stands.

Check out the blog post HERE at Our Nostalgic Memories!

Rejoice – Establishment Blues [1968]

From the dusty, vinyl-scratched archives comes this folk rock groove that single-handedly epitomizes the anti-establishment movement of the late 1960s.

I’ll be honest; I had never heard of Rejoice. Ever. It was only after we received the golden pickins from our neighbor’s LP collection that I came across this album in one of the boxes. The first track – “Sausalito Sunrise” – is almost unplayable due to a dip in the record. But the rest of the disk, in all its clicky-poppy awesomeness, simply oozes the musical equivalent to a tirade against The Establishment, punctuated by chants of “I hate The Man.” What a slow groovy trip.

Listen for references to transistor radios, secretaries, discos, and typewriters.

Rejoice LP 1968 003

Rejoice LP 1968 004

Rejoice LP 1968 002

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