Posts from the ‘1960s’ Category

Keith Mansfield – Exclusive Blend [1969]

If this groovy instrumental doesn’t make your foot move involuntarily, then check your shoe for cement.

Keith Mansfield is a British composer/arranger who had knack for summing up a mood in the short time required by the broadcasting projects he scored. His songs are a time capsule of the 1960s and 70s and, in my opinion, full of quality and nuance that is sometimes overshadowed by goofiness of the era. His song Funky Fanfare has even been used as recently as 2010 for the theme song for Pit Boss.

This is the good stuff!

Empire State Building – Summer 1969

vernonmerritt3_1969

Published in LIFE magazine during that magical time, in an equally magical New York City. The old world blended and clashed with the new that Summer, with colors and styles which spoke more about individuality than they did about being part of the big picture.

Or the Big Apple.

The photo above was taken by Vernon Merritt III, a veteran photographer by the time he captured New York that summer. Merritt was fearless in his job; he covered the Civil Rights Movement in the early 60s, and also got wounded – and temporarily paralyzed – while on assignment during the Vietnam War.  He stayed with LIFE magazine as a photographer until it closed up shop in 1972 (it launched again later in the decade).  Merritt died in 2000.

In this picture I love his juxtaposition of old and new: Empire State Building – by that time several decades old – and a construction crane representing the dawn of a new high rise. It’s a beautiful and simple image.

Click HERE for more photos from Vernon Merritt.

Jets and Rockets!

Bell X-15 Rocket Plane and Boeing B-52 Flyover (Public Domain)

The Cold War was an amazing time of wholesale fear tied to the rise of technology.

As world powers tread lightly on subjects of military might, atomic weapons, and troop deployments, the engineering behind the power was being displayed and used in other ways.  Rocket power and jet bombers were perfect examples of technology which had come to fruition in the 1950s, and ultimately fine-tuned into the factors we see in the picture above.

Ladies and gentlemen, the Bell X-15 and the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress.

The X-15 was built to test the limits of aerospace technology, operating from 1959 to 1970 with NASA.  It set many records in both speed and altitude,

An American icon of power and aviation, the B-52 first flew in 1954 and went into service with the US Air Force in 1955.  Of the original 744 built through 1962, about 85 continue to fly.  I started looking for cool B-52 pictures recently after reading that the planes were now being configured with Sniper Pods, which will make them an even-more effective tool when collaborating air strikes with ground forces.  Current fitment timelines have it flying – with continuous maintenance – until its full retirement in the 2040s.

That’s right; it will be flying the skies in our military for nearly 90 years.

HL-10 Lifting Body and B-52 Flyover (Public Domain)

 

Now that’s what I call Long Range!

Remembering Fotomat on Our Nostalgic Memories Blog

fotomat

Courtesy of Our Nostalgic Memories

Came across this blog post today while checking in on Google+. It is a detailed history of Fotomat, which started in 1965 and only closed completely in 2009. To be honest I didn’t realize it lasted that long!

I used Fotomat services in the 1980s, dropping off at my local kiosk in Shoreline WA.  I still have a few packs of negatives in Fotomat containers today.  Even some Kodachrome slides which were sent out for develop and mount.  In my neck of the woods, many of the remaining kiosks were repurposed as espresso stands.

Check out the blog post HERE at Our Nostalgic Memories!

Rejoice – Establishment Blues [1968]

From the dusty, vinyl-scratched archives comes this folk rock groove that single-handedly epitomizes the anti-establishment movement of the late 1960s.

I’ll be honest; I had never heard of Rejoice. Ever. It was only after we received the golden pickins from our neighbor’s LP collection that I came across this album in one of the boxes. The first track – “Sausalito Sunrise” – is almost unplayable due to a dip in the record. But the rest of the disk, in all its clicky-poppy awesomeness, simply oozes the musical equivalent to a tirade against The Establishment, punctuated by chants of “I hate The Man.” What a slow groovy trip.

Listen for references to transistor radios, secretaries, discos, and typewriters.

Rejoice LP 1968 003

Rejoice LP 1968 004

Rejoice LP 1968 002

Walter Cronkite And The Home of The 21st Century [1967]

This 25-minute news piece from 1967 predicts home computers, the mass appeal of microwave cooking, personal robots, and green construction.  The bank of monitors in the den and teletype in the kitchen are quite the indicator that – even in the 1960s – people knew that technology would invade every corner of our homes.

There was nothing like the reporting style of Walter Cronkite, whose news copy read like a celebration of the English language:

“The search for a home nestled in nature often ends in the empty repetition and tasteless sterility of a suburban tract development. Instead of delighting in natural beauty, urban sprawl defiles it.”

Shiny New Cadillacs [1966}

These are from the era “when Giant Cars ruled the Earth.” I see a white Coupe deVille in the back, and a pair of Fleetwoods. With all that floor-to-ceiling glass and shiny chrome, that is MY kind of dealership!


Scan courtesy of X-Ray Delta One on Flickr

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