Posts from the ‘1980s’ Category

Lando Calrissian BK Collector Glass [1980]

Found this at Goodwill today for three bucks.

Is this Burger King collectible even worth three dollars? No idea. But I like Star Wars memorabilia, especially stuff from the original movie series.

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Twisted Sister – I Wanna Rock [1984]

Best tribute to the legend of a song is when it is spoofed by Weird Al Yankovic or redone by Sponge Bob Squarepants!

Remembering Fotomat on Our Nostalgic Memories Blog

fotomat

Courtesy of Our Nostalgic Memories

Came across this blog post today while checking in on Google+. It is a detailed history of Fotomat, which started in 1965 and only closed completely in 2009. To be honest I didn’t realize it lasted that long!

I used Fotomat services in the 1980s, dropping off at my local kiosk in Shoreline WA.  I still have a few packs of negatives in Fotomat containers today.  Even some Kodachrome slides which were sent out for develop and mount.  In my neck of the woods, many of the remaining kiosks were repurposed as espresso stands.

Check out the blog post HERE at Our Nostalgic Memories!

Quiet Riot’s “Metal Health” From 1983 Gets Its Due Attention In 2013

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Lately I’ve been digitizing some songs from my record collection, pulling sources from albums I’ve had for decades – or ones that I’ve found at thrift stores over the years. It’s pretty hard to pass up a 99-cent copy of Herb Alpert, Sergio Mendes, Sarah Vaughan, or Henry Mancini, when you still have a working record player. I mean, seriously…single MP3 tracks off Amazon or Apple cost that, and only if that vintage track is available at all. I can get the whole album for the same price?

Here’s my dollar, Ms. Cashier.

Plus of course, there is the argument over the “warmth” of listening to analog recordings from vinyl. Frankly my ear isn’t well tuned enough to hear anything shrill in digital remasters. I will say this: there is a familiarity to hearing the “clicks and pops” of a record, something tangible and tactile on a turntable playing a song for me through a vinyl track of glory.

Life isn’t perfect, and therefore the soundtrack to life shouldn’t necessarily demand perfection.

Last night I was putting away canned goods in the pantry when I spied a box of records that hadn’t been touched in a while. Taking a quick look inside exposed a few items I had owned since the 1980s, along with some other items given to me by friends when they gave away their record player in the early 1990s. One of those albums is the one you see here: Metal Health by Quiet Riot.

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Of course there’s nothing quiet about it; Metal Health was standard-issue early-80s rock, courtesy of the blaring-yet-powerful high-pitched vocals of Kevin DuBrow, mixed with the hook-heavy guitar solos of Carlos Cavazo and solid backing by Frankie Banali and Rudy Sarzo. Since its release in 1983, the album has sold over 6 million copies. Quiet Riot was a seasoned crew of performers by this time, having been together for a decade. They played many of the same venues as Van Halen during the 1970s. While not achieving the same notoriety as other L.A. rock bands of the era, they continued to play until 2007, when singer DuBrow was found dead of a cocaine overdose at his home. They reformed in 2010; none of the original early-70s line up remains.

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On my copy of the album the first track is titled “Metal Health,” which according to resources makes it part of the first release. On subsequent releases of the album, the track was retitled as “Bang Your Head (Metal Health)” – which is what most people called it anyway. Much like The Who’s Baba O’Riley being called “Teenage Wasteland” by most of the listening public.

Metal Health is considered widely to be Quiet Riot’s largest hit and, thanks to the 2013 Superbowl, has seen a worthy tribute 30 years later as part of a really funny Hyundai commercial – the two versions of which are posted below:

And if you’re itching to hear the original song in its epic entirety, here’s the track I digitized from my LP version. All Hail Vinyl!

Self Portrait [1985]

Portrait on The Floating Bridge - 1985

I love before & after shots.

There’s something inherently cool about being able to duplicate a photograph from the past, to see what the differences are between the old and the new.  I did exactly that a couple of years ago, when I came across a 1985 photo I took of myself on the Lacy V. Murrow Bridge across Lake Washington (aka “The Floating Bridge”).  The shot I took back in the day couldn’t be redone, because there is no longer a sidewalk along the south side of the span.  But still, it was fun to see how much things have changed.

And even since the stunning Mrs. BelRedRoad took the 2010 photo, I’ve lost 50 pounds, so change keeps coming.

For more about this self portrait, read my write-up on Intersect – https://intersect.com/stories/0lscWHDfYGw9

Telly Savalas for Player’s Club – “It’s Bonus Time Baby!” [1986]

I can’t think of a better representative for casino/hotel entertainment than Telly Savalas.

This Player’s Club commercial from 1986 shows Telly giving us the lowdown on how to get his life of ease while in Vegas or Atlantic City. For $125 and an annual fee, members got discounts on all sorts of stuff on the Boardwalk or on The Strip. It was a pretty sweet deal.

“It’s bonus time baby!”

King Richard and his Trans Am

Richard Petty / Goodyear - Motor Trend July 1982

A number of years ago I started collecting car magazines from the late 1970s and early 1980s, to salvage their advertisements for sale on eBay. This one – for some reason – never got sold!

Richard Petty is one of the best-known racers in NASCAR. He is still involved with racing, only not behind the wheel. The Petty family is firmly planted both in the fabric and legend of the sport, with multiple generations being involved.

The King is leaning against a 1982 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, available with a fuel-injected 5.0 liter V8 and automatic transmission.

Storin’ It Old School

Storin' it Old School

Remember these guys? With a whopping 720 kilobytes of storage, they would hold two or three DOS games or a thousand text documents. They were amazing for their time and surprisingly durable.

I found these at a computer recycling store in Bellevue WA – fresh, minty, and ready to use by those who can even locate a 5″ floppy drive to run them! Of course now, I can’t even fit one digital photo on a 720k disk 🙂

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floppy_disk

Quiet Artesians and Wild Rainiers

When I was at the grocery store the other day, I saw two Pacific Northwest legends in the cooler near each other; Rainier and Olympia beers began life in my neck of the woods, and have been brewed for well over 100 years.  Olympia was brewed originally in Washington’s state capital.  The Rainier brewery’s owner even started a baseball team – the Seattle Rainiers – to advertise his product.  While both brands depict legendary northwest mountains, they are now owned by Pabst and have been moved out of state.

The flavors of these beers won’t win awards, but their stature in PNW popular culture has allowed them to be the enduring kings of the cookouts.

Seattle is a place now where craft beers and international brands are readily available, especially from Mexico.  Granted, many of them are good.  But at one time this area was a mid-sized blue collar region where local beer labels carried hometown pride and became famous namesakes.  Every region has at least one – Lone Star in Texas, Primo in Hawaii, Coors in Colorado, and even Red Stripe in Jamaica.

But in the early 1980s, no Seattle high school party was complete until the Big Red R arrived – either in keg or rack form – and righteously extracted from the trunk of a jacked-up Camaro.

The stunning Mrs. BelRedRoad shares tales of her father’s drinking “Oly” when she was growing up.  They were both cheap, had generally good flavor, and depicted local mountains of notoriety.  Both brands were also well known for their TV commercials (shown below).  Rainier made fun of itself, professing the existence of “Wild Rainiers” and motorcycles that said “RayyyyNeeer….Beeeerrr” as it was running through the gears.  They even had talking frogs long before Budweiser. Olympia – banking on the fact that no one knew what an Artesian Well was – claimed the water came from secretive Artesians that also played jokes on people.

The old Olympia Brewery closed in 2003.

Oly Oly Oh;

The former Rainier Brewery in Seattle – now the Tully’s Coffee roasting plant and art studios – stood with its iconic giant lit red R viewable from Interstate 5. The famous R is now housed at the Museum of History and Industry.

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So sing a round of Oly Oly Oh, or crack open a Wild Rainier.  They may no longer be from Washington, but they still make a hometown proud!

Madonna in 1984 – Courtesy of We Heart Vintage

Madonna 1984

This now-classic image and look from Like A Virgin caused such a stir back in the mid-1980s.  Not that I look at it again – more that 25 years down the road – everything about it is simply beautiful.

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