Posts from the ‘Art’ Category

Afghan Awesomeness [1966]

Bernat Afghans VII

A thrift store treasure, beyond measure ūüôā

I found this brief catalog – Bernat Afghans’ Contemporary and Traditional Styles, Book no. 132 – in a Long Beach WA shop for a whopping 25-cents. Initially I thought it would be a nice addition to Wall Of Retro – one which could dish out some of the cheesiness that only the mid-1960s could provide. Yet, as I began looking through the publication, I discovered that the pictures were just short of amazing. Staged without looking staged. Telling multiple stories, while giving focus to the subject of the catalog. The photographer employed a delicate depth of field in the work, and a film used duplicated the subject’s colors at an amazing level.

In short, I was duped by 25-cents worth of awesomeness.

While I was taken in by the quality of the photography, the stunning Mrs. BelRedRoad was smitten with the afghans themselves. “That’s beautiful work,” she said of the first one she saw, “and expensive.”

Bernat Afghans VIII

The stories depicted in these pictures are ones of relaxation, wonder, longing, and tranquility. In a sense, a warm afghan should be providing at least a couple of those – even ones that don’t cost big bucks. Check out these pictures; aside from being a warm time capsule of the Sixties, they also embody the feelings and softness in life which many of us want.

Bernat Afghans XX

I always make sure my chauffeur has an afghan handy…

Bernat Afghans XIV

Bernat Afghans VI

Bernat Afghans III

Bernat Afghans II

Bernat Afghans I

Bernat Afghans XVIII

Bernat Afghans XVII

Bernat Afghans XIII

Bernat Afghans XII

Bernat Afghans X

Bernat Afghans V

Bernat Afghans IV

Bernat Afghans IX

Bernat Afghans XI

Bernat Afghans XV

Bernat Afghans XVI

Refreshment in Coca-Pulco! [1957]

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This is the beyond-awesome artistic advert from the back of the February 1957 issue of National Geographic.  The graphic Рdepicting Acapulco Mexico in all its space-age vacation glory Рwas done by Robert Fawcett, a highly-noted illustrator of the period.  He died ten years after penning this Coca-Cola ad.

Five months later, Acapulco suffered a major 7.9 Earthquake.

Click on the ad picture to see a larger version.

The Wide-Track `67 Pontiac

1966 Pontiac Bonneville - May 1972 [Public Domain]

I will freely admit to being a gear head.

In fact, I have a thing for big Sixties full-sized passenger vehicles; my first car was a 1960 Buick LeSabre. ¬†Even my second car was big – a clapped-out `65 Impala. ¬†That said, I would have absolutely no trouble in owning today’s featured vessel: The “Wide-Track” 1967 Pontiac.

1967 Pontiac Bonneville

Photo courtesy of Rob Hartog

Stylish and huge, the Catalina, Ventura, and Bonneville models all had “stacked headlights” and and bumpers integrated with the lines of the car. ¬†Engine choices were “Huge” and “More Huge.” ¬†Driving one of these was like a dream; with its quintessential American stance and smooth settings on the suspension, they excelled in straight-line driving and road trips – giving up some ability in the corners.

1967 Pontiac Bonneville

Photo courtesy of Walt Woodruff

Bonnie_Eyes

Photo courtesy of RaysnCayne

DM-08-36  Pontiac Bonneville [1967]

Photo courtesy of Bram Visser

Art Fitzpatrick penned a large number of automotive ads during his successful art career, including many of them for Pontiac.  His jaunty upbeat take on the full-sized GM products of the 1960s is now legendary.  Some of those ads Рdepicting the `67 Pontiac Рare shown below, and others can be seen here.

Yesterday's Ride ~ 1967 Pontiac Bonneville

Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

1967 Pontiac Station Wagons

1967 Pontiac Bonneville Wide-Track

Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

1967 Pontiac Bonneville Ad

Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

art fitzpatrick_'67e

Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

art fitzpatrick_'67f

Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

art fitzpatrick_'67b

Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

Madonna in 1984 – Courtesy of We Heart Vintage

Madonna 1984

This now-classic image and look from Like A Virgin caused such a stir back in the mid-1980s.  Not that I look at it again Рmore that 25 years down the road Рeverything about it is simply beautiful.

Star Wars, Gerbils and A Shiny Shirt [1978]

Okay, so I wasn’t all that cool in the 1970s.

But at least I had good taste in posters.  The more I looked at this picture taken of me in 1978, the more I remembered from that time.

Read my write-up on Intersect!

“Yew!!” Garbage Pail Kids!

Oww...

I bought my first pack of Garbage Pail Kids cards in 1986.

I missed the first two series, and got caught up in collecting them on Series 3 release. ¬†That means I missed the most famous one from the early days: Adam Bomb. ¬†Being 22 years old at the time, I was quite a bit past the “niche market” for this collectible. Still, being a kid who grew up reading Mad magazine and National Lampoon, I loved them for some reason. As one of my fairer friends told me one day when I was discussing GPK with her, “Look at you…a grown man talking about these like you’re eight.”

It was about that time I started buying fewer packs.

But I kept my stash. Over the years I shared a few, lost a few, and scanned a few. The images and names still crack me up 25 years later. Maybe it was the¬†irreverent mocking of Cabbage Patch Kids that did it for me. ¬†No matter what the cause, they became a vital part of my life’s archive, and something that I now share with my sons (who also love them).

Blue Boy George

“I bought you something,” my wife said last night when she got home. Out of her bag came two packs of Garbage Pail Kids cards. Awesome! What other wife would buy her husband GPK? She truly understands me ūüôā

The packs came in one container with a Bonus card (Jack O. Lantern).

Inside was also a 3D card and a Before/After card. ¬†My favorite in the pack? ¬†The admittedly non-PC “Boozin’ Bruce.”

But for our purposes here at the Wall Of Retro, Dial-A-Twyla with a Rotary Phone nose is probably more appropriate!

Garbage Pail Kids are a retro item that just keep retro-ing, because they’ve been released now for a new generation to enjoy and go “Yew!” And so far they seem to be grabbing them same amount of attention as before.

Timeless Style – 30 Reasons to love the Photography of Willem van de Poll

This pensive pose by a Paris model comes to you courtesy of a photographer I had never heard of.

In fact, it was like an act of Congress to find anything good Рin English Рabout Willem van de Poll (1895 Р1970).  He studied photography in Vienna, and worked as a freelance press photographer throughout Europe, the Middle East, Indonesia and the Caribbean during his long career. His photographs depict life and products of the mid 20th century, with most shots being done in black and white.  Thankfully I did find a Wiki page about him in Dutch.

His style was sleak and timeless, while the lighting was often impeccable.

Evidenced above, van de Poll was able to portray a softer positive side of life in an unobtrusive way. ¬†I would almost call him a street photographer, because many of his photos – part of a veritable truckload – seem to have that “on-the-fly” feel of his contemporaries¬†Henri Cartier-Bresson¬†and¬†Vivian Maier; what set him apart from others of his time was a street photo style with polish, a dedication that discounted the notion that he simply leveled a camera and shot. ¬†While Cartier-Bresson and Maier are better known, and seemed to catch people at their most vulnerable moments, van de Poll seemed to catch them often at their most beautiful. ¬†His unplanned photos are as uplifting and have as much detail as the shots he set up.

I am confused on why I’ve never heard of him until now.

Below you’ll find 30 reasons to love the photography of Willem van de Poll, representing the thousands of photos he took during his lifetime. ¬†By looking through them, I think you’ll discover – like I did – a great photographer and treasure from the era that should have more notoriety.

Fotograaf Van Haren aan boord van de ms. Nestor op weg naar Suriname

Strandganger

Egmund Jozef Treu, hoofdkapitein van Ganzee, 73 jaar

vrouwen, paardebloemen, Paardebloemen

Kussend bruidspaar

Model met bal / model with ball

Generaal Kruls en een vrouwelijke militair

Seinwachter bij de Lorelei aan de telefoon met andere seinposten langs de Rijn

Voorbijgangers kijken ge√Įnteresseerd in de etalage van een boekwinkel

kerstmis, pakjes, bloemen, grummes

Duiker Fischer met een andere duiker op een boot in de Fuikbaai

vrouwen, koffiedrinken

Een geschenk voor de koningin: een doos met servetten met de namen van het konin…

carnaval, kostuums, matrozen

flessen, slaolie, slabestek, Saladine

Eerste stuurman Hans en zijn verloofde Annie gearmd op het dek van de Damco 9

Publieke schrijvers zitten met een typemachine achter een tafel op het trottoir …

glas, glazen, sinaasappels, citroenen, persen

Reiziger met bagage en een levensgrote speelgoedpop op de kade voor een schip

herenkleding, overhemden, dassen, kostuums, polo bagatelle

De kinderen van gouverneur Struycken met hun moeder in een auto bij de ontvangst…

modellen, hoeden, eliane richer

Arbeider op de kade in de haven

Vaticaanstad, basiliek St. Pieter. Hoogaltaar naar het ontwerp van Bernini met b…

bevolking, schippers, boten, Bokma, P.

Prinses Beatrix, prinses Irene en prins Bernhard kijken naar voorbij varende sch…

modellen, hoeden, De Decker, Toque, P.

Vader met kind op de arm  op de plek waar het gezin hun huis zal gaan bouwen. De…

De Franse generaal de Lattre de Tassigny

De prinsessen Irene en Margriet kijken uit een openstaand raam van het zomerhuis…

——————

About Willem van de Poll¬†(in Dutch) –¬†http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willem_van_de_Poll
Photos in Dutch National Archive – At Gahetna.nl

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