Posts from the ‘The Future’ Category

Walter Cronkite And The Home of The 21st Century [1967]

This 25-minute news piece from 1967 predicts home computers, the mass appeal of microwave cooking, personal robots, and green construction.  The bank of monitors in the den and teletype in the kitchen are quite the indicator that – even in the 1960s – people knew that technology would invade every corner of our homes.

There was nothing like the reporting style of Walter Cronkite, whose news copy read like a celebration of the English language:

“The search for a home nestled in nature often ends in the empty repetition and tasteless sterility of a suburban tract development. Instead of delighting in natural beauty, urban sprawl defiles it.”

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Space Needle on Kodachrome [ca. 1980]

Space Needle - Kodachrome Slide

Seattle’s Space Needle is immediately recognizable as a city icon…at least to the folks around here.  But when I bought this slide from an eBayer in Arizona, it was described as “35mm Slide Parking Lot w/ Tower.”  Never heard it called a tower, but we can go with that.  Besides: If it had been labeled as “Space Needle” the photo would have sold before I got to it!

This Kodakchrome slide is not dated; I would time it circa late 1970s or early 1980s.  The SkyLine level – added 100-foot up in 1982 – does not appear on the structure.  Cars in the scene include a Plymouth Volare, 1963-ish Ford Falcon, BMW 320i and Volvo station wagon.  The structure behind the man’s head is the track for the Monorail – another Seattle icon.

If you can’t get enough of the Space Needle, take a look at its timeline on Intersect.  Also, check out some of the Space Needle shots I’ve taken over the years:

http://www.flickr.com/apps/slideshow/show.swf?v=109615

Space Needle Stamp – First Day of Issue [1962]

Space Needle - First Day Issue Stamp, 25 April 1962

Seattle’s famous asset…on a stamp!

Originally designed on a dinner napkin, the Space Needle was built for the 1962 World’s Fair; it stands now – fifty years later – as the most notable feature of both the city and the event.  Second most notable – the Monorail – still runs from the base of the Needle south to Westlake Center on 5th Avenue.

I love the background behind the stylized needle on the left, like the sky is on fire!

The Century 21 Exposition was an optimistic view of the future, where electronics and science ruled the world. Other enduring features of the fair included the Center House, the Bubbleator, and what is now the Pacific Science Center.

Aerial of Space Needle and fairgrounds during construction from southeast, Seattle World's Fair, ca. 1961

The Museum of History and Industry recently compiled an assortment of promotional and documentary films, done before and during the Fair. It provides a look into the early days of the Space Needle, Monorail and other Seattle icons. Comments about Science at the Fair are done by Dixie Lee Ray, who went on to become Washington’s Governor during the 1970s. Check out the films here: http://www.seattlechannel.org/videos/video.asp?ID=4030725

For more pictures of the Space Needle done in a timeline, check out this compilation on Intersect.

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