Posts from the ‘Video’ Category

Keith Mansfield – Exclusive Blend [1969]

If this groovy instrumental doesn’t make your foot move involuntarily, then check your shoe for cement.

Keith Mansfield is a British composer/arranger who had knack for summing up a mood in the short time required by the broadcasting projects he scored. His songs are a time capsule of the 1960s and 70s and, in my opinion, full of quality and nuance that is sometimes overshadowed by goofiness of the era. His song Funky Fanfare has even been used as recently as 2010 for the theme song for Pit Boss.

This is the good stuff!

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Rejoice – Establishment Blues [1968]

From the dusty, vinyl-scratched archives comes this folk rock groove that single-handedly epitomizes the anti-establishment movement of the late 1960s.

I’ll be honest; I had never heard of Rejoice. Ever. It was only after we received the golden pickins from our neighbor’s LP collection that I came across this album in one of the boxes. The first track – “Sausalito Sunrise” – is almost unplayable due to a dip in the record. But the rest of the disk, in all its clicky-poppy awesomeness, simply oozes the musical equivalent to a tirade against The Establishment, punctuated by chants of “I hate The Man.” What a slow groovy trip.

Listen for references to transistor radios, secretaries, discos, and typewriters.

Rejoice LP 1968 003

Rejoice LP 1968 004

Rejoice LP 1968 002

Walter Cronkite And The Home of The 21st Century [1967]

This 25-minute news piece from 1967 predicts home computers, the mass appeal of microwave cooking, personal robots, and green construction.  The bank of monitors in the den and teletype in the kitchen are quite the indicator that – even in the 1960s – people knew that technology would invade every corner of our homes.

There was nothing like the reporting style of Walter Cronkite, whose news copy read like a celebration of the English language:

“The search for a home nestled in nature often ends in the empty repetition and tasteless sterility of a suburban tract development. Instead of delighting in natural beauty, urban sprawl defiles it.”

American Airlines Route Map [1959]

1959 American Airlines Route Map Details

I picked this up because I love airplanes, especially what is called “1st Generation Jet Airliners” like the Boeing 707.

1959 American Airlines Route Map Details

This route map was printed in October 1959, when American Airlines was using the 707 and the Lockheed L-118 Electra.

Boeing : 707

Boeing 707

Boeing : 707

American Airlines 707 at LAX

Lockheed : L-188 : Electra

Lockheed L-188 Electra

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Stewardesses and admirers near a L-118 Electra

Lockheed : L-188 : Electra

Lockheed L-188 Electra

Look closely on the map below and you’ll see that Havana Cuba was still part of the flight routes out of the US:

1959 American Airlines Route Map Details

Flights to Mexico were not nearly as comprehensive as they are today:

1959 American Airlines Route Map Details

And JFK airport in New York was still called Idlewild!

1959 American Airlines Route Map Details

 

Barracuda!

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By far one of the finer offerings of the late 1960s was the Plymouth Barracuda.

Considered a small car by Sixties standards, the “Cuda was part of what came to be known as “The Pony Car Movement.”  The name was derived from its competitive relationship with the Ford Mustang, but in reality the Barracuda had been on the market before the Mustang was introduced in mid-1964.

The final model hit the street in 1974.

The Barracuda came with 6-cylinder or V8 engines.  Large motors were available in special packages, which made the car meaner and faster.  While Plymouth as a car make is no more, there is talk about the next Chrysler super car to be based on the famous `Cuda name.

Photo courtesy Wikipedia

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Photo courtesy Tom Hardin – 1983

1968 Plymouth Barracuda 2-Door Fastback (1 of 6)

Photo by Randy von Liski

Let’s Tango with Harry Horlick and His Orchestra! [1959]

Translated literally as “The Touch,” Tango is a dance that is performed exactly as it is described.

With its roots in Europe and Africa, Argentina today stands as the popular source of Tango. The music and the dance are distinctive, flowing and beautiful.

Harry Horlick wasn’t from Argentina.

Harry Horlick

That didn’t stop this Russian immigrant from putting out at least two Tango albums. The one seen here is a thrift-store find, worn to the point of being grey in the grooves. But the beauty of Tango makes its way through anyway. I digitized a couple of the tracks into a video for your home dancing pleasure 🙂

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Ray Coniff His Orchestra and Chorus – Mack The Knife [1963]

He had the chops to be considered the King Of Easy Listening.

When I think of instrumental versions of popular songs, I always think of Ray Coniff and His Orchestra. As a band leader, he was great. And to get what could easily be called “The Ray Coniff Sound,” he added choral parts over the instruments. Still without words, the vocals added an element to the songs that seemed to smooth everything out.

Listen to his version of Mack The Knife from 1963, digitized from glorious vinyls, and you’ll see what I mean!

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