Posts tagged ‘1964’

Raglan For Boys And Girls [1964]

One can find all sorts of fun things at a thrift store. In my case, I found a coverless Bear Brand pattern book called Raglans for Boys and Girls – Sizes 4 to 14. It was Volume #80 from 1964, and sold for a whopping 85 cents new. Not only were there pictures of the products, but also instructions on how to make them.

bearbrand64m

“X+Y…Girl+Boy…Huh huh huh heheheh,,,”

I was immediately taken by the fact that these kid models were super-clean cut and not-cheesy.  Oddly, some of the styles from nearly fifty years ago would go over well even now, in an environment where conservative dress is required.

bearbrand64a

Others aren’t so fortunate:

bearbrand64d

“Suzy? Can I have the rest of my dress now?”

bearbrand64l

The next picture shows how photo editing was done prior to have computers:

bearbrand64k

The boy was not part of the original picture; he was taped in behind the dog and next to the girl.  If you look closely above her, you’ll see the cut line in a zig zag pattern with the bricks.

No photo editors required 🙂

bearbrand64j

“But Jenny, their tentacles are starting to push through my scalp and they burn…”

bearbrand64i

“Mom was right. It did shoot my eye out.”

bearbrand64h

As dawn breaks, she sings the praises of the Motherland…

bearbrand64g

“So…your sister’s ball is kinda bouncy…”

bearbrand64f

bearbrand64e

“But my gym teacher says I’ll be taller than you in six months…”

bearbrand64c

She has two weeks worth of her wardrobe lined up in an orderly fashion.

bearbrand64b

“Maggie, I spit on my hand…”

Advertisements

Found Photos from New York [1963-64]

Feb. 2, 1963 New York, 42 Street a

Susan Healey got bitten by the old camera bug.

It’s an addictive habit; old cameras come in so many shapes and sizes, plus many of them still work.  In my world, people give me film cameras because they have moved completely to digital.  If anything, they are cool to look at even if they don’t work (case in point is this Canon AL-1, which doesn’t power up).  Sometimes it’s nice to have a collection for comparison purposes, and there are plenty of clubs around the US that still provide a camera nut with plenty to see.

To feed her addiction to cameras, Susan spends a lot of time at camera swap meets and events. “I discovered the Photographic Historical Society of New England a few years ago,” she said in an email, “and a couple of times a year they have a big event called Photographica.”

Like other types of swap meets, people come from all over the place to buy and sell cameras, film and other photographic equipment. On one occasion, she found more than cameras at a table.  “One of the vendors had a few piles of old photos,” Susan explained. “When I saw them I couldn’t believe they hadn’t been snatched up yet.

For about $5.00, they were mine.”

I agree with Susan’s description of these photos as “an amazing glimpse of well-known areas and time.” The signage, the cars, and the buildings are all so perfectly preserved in photographic form that it’s almost as if we are pulled right into the scenes. And the people in the photos also are very stylish; the cut of the clothing they’re wearing is clearly money, and the care each has taken to be presentable – save one photo – is very obvious. I know it would be corny to mention Mad Men at this point, but I am truly reminded of that hit series when looking at these photos.

Susan’s take on the collection is heart-felt.

“Every time I go (to the swap meets), I look through the old photos but have never found anything that moved me as much as these ones did.”

I totally agree. The photos are truly a hashmark on the map of time.  The colors, while a bit faded, are very accurate for the era.  It helps that the pictures are clear, and that the photographer seems to be good at what she/he did.  Check out each photo below; they range from big city scenes to snowy rural backgrounds – with stylish 60s beach photos sure to peak some interest in the the folks over at We Heart Vintage.  Click on any of the pictures to go see more info about them on Flickr.

Enjoy!

Aug. 3, 1963

1960s halter tops left nothing to imagine.  Gotta admit she’s pretty ripped for being in the 1960s. That’s a 1960 Ford Galaxie behind her.

Aug. 3,1963

One has to wonder if they ever got all of that into the little red Corvair!

Dec.1963

Love the old Texaco sign.  Same Corvair from above appears to be making an encore appearance in the background.

December 1963

Umm…is he peeing in the snow?  Next to the Corvair?

Feb. 17, 1963 Time Square NY

New York City, 42nd Street – Dodge Lancer speeds past an old Buick on the left and a yellow 1963 Chev Bel-Air taxi on the right.

Feb.  2, 1963 New York Broadway

Feb. 2, 1963 New York, 42 Street

1962 Chev Bel-Air taxi speeds through intersection, followed by an Oldsmobile and Thunderbird.

Feb. 2, 1963 Empire State Building

Empire State Building

April 12, 1963 Castkill

Bridge to the Catskills.

July 4, 1963 Big Beach  P. Jeff

They look like a Chet and a Burl.  I’m kinda impressed that that they don’t have floppy double-martini 60s bodies.

July 5, 1963 P.J.

Chet and Burl’s chicks.

Aug. 1963

What a trio; they are so stylish!  This shot alone made the five-dollars Susan paid for the whole album worth the purchase.

Jan 30, 1963 155 Park Ave, Lyndhurst

Oct. 12, 1963 Jency Ln Pency ln

March 1964

The Whitehouse

April 12, 1963 Suffern

Suffern NY – 1963.  That’s a righteous Dodge or Plymouth.

Apr. 13, 1963

Studebaker at the pump!  Bonus points for the `55 Ford on the right.

Father-In-Law was a Cool Traveler in `64

Recently a bag of slides appeared in the mail from my wife’s aunt. The note said, “Thought you might like these slides from Grandmother’s collection. I’ve had these for several years!” The bag was truly a treasure trove of memories, depicting my wife’s parent in their twenties around the time that she was born.

Best of all, many of them were Kodachrome and still had the rich colors the media type was known for.

This slide was taken somewhere in Oregon or Washington, while the wife’s family was on a camping trip. She would have been just a month old at that point. The car – possibly a 1962 Pontiac – was owned by her grandparents. The Security Traveler “canned ham” trailer: pure Sixties righteousness. My father-in-law, ever thin as he is today, takes a drag off his Marlboro and looks pensively into his Dad’s camera. I love the design in his shirt, and the pencil-thin pants.  The clothes and the stance depict the essence of cool.  While he no longer smokes, to this day he stands in the same way.

And so does my brother-in-law!

%d bloggers like this: