Posts tagged ‘1970s’

A Monopoly On Fashion

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Colin Swan, newsman for the CHLO in Canada, awards the winner of the 1976 Monopoly Tournament at Elgin Mall, St. Thomas Ontario. No doubt that Joey Starcevic on the far right is wondering how much money he’ll need to save for buying a sweet blazer like Colin’s.

Photo courtesy Elgin County Archives

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Groovy Daycare

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No doubt they’re on their way to the Rec Center to play PONG.

Wicked Street Machines of The 1970s

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If you’re a gear head like me, you can’t get cars out of the blood.

For me the most notable “period of influence” for anything automotive was the 1970s; it was when I started building models.  It was when I started drawing customs.  It was when I bought my first car.  I am still in love with the long lines and thirsty engines that once pounded the streets of Seattle – announced with Cherry Bombs or Sidepipes and rolling on mags with back ends jacked up to the sky.

It would take years of therapy to strip that image from my mind, so I don’t even try.

Recently on Tumblr I came across a blog that celebrates that era through personal photos submitted by its readers.  70sStreetMachines is an archive of custom awesomeness, with the stripes, the paint, the spoilers, and the wheels which point to a decade of driving where America lived by “Anything Goes.”  There is no short trip to this blog!  I found myself stuck in a loop of viewing picture after picture, remembering what it was like to be 12 to 14 years old and wishing I was old enough to own effectively anything there.

Visit and Enjoy!

http://70sstreetmachines.tumblr.com/

Can’t Get the Bewitched Theme Song Out Of My Head!

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Collage created in Microsoft So.cl

There could be worse things looping on my internal 8-Track, so having the theme from Bewitched stuck in my head isn’t such a bad gig.  And what a show, for those who remember all the noteworthy characters like Endora, Uncle Arthur, the nosey Mrs. Kravitz, and even the sleazy Larry Tate.  And let’s be honest: Elizabeth Montgomery was beautiful, and lost to us far too early.

So here’s to all those days after elementary school when I would come home and watch Bewitched over a bowl of hot Spaghetti-Os!

Knit Maxi Dress [1973]

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Long dresses have come back into style recently.  A quick search of the term “maxi dress” comes up with near-countless stores offering the long lengths in many styles and colors.  Thankfully, the cut and fabric is now much better than it was the last time such dresses were popular.

And thankfully, knitting your maxi dress is no longer necessary.

This gem was found in the Fall/Winter 1973-74 issue of McCall’s Needlework & Crafts. With her slippers and really old book, the model is settling in for a night of badly-lit reading.  Or entertaining Aunt Flo.  The plunging knit neckline dares to call out that she is kind of young, kind of now – “Charlie!” The iron cauldron above the hearth is locked down once more, cleaned and dried after the last initiation.  The hard-wood rocking chair is sure to create unparalleled back spasms after 45 minutes – time enough to get through the first chapter and grab a hot toddy.

Knit in a base of green, her wearable couch throw is adorned in the whimsical colors of a candy box.

This mating can only come from a decade which already represents so many of our styling debacles.  The gold about her neck shines against the spotlights above her kitchen counter, and snags the yarn with ease.  Lapels a-plenty are a classy accessory, certainly shiny and stretchy in a way only polyester can move.  Her makeup and hair are done to the final detail, telling her man that this book can be laid down and her matching coat is waiting in the hall closet.  Are the colors of this maxi dress Christmas-like?  Maybe.  Is the maxi dress warm?  Probably, to the point that the fire at her back is probably making her itch.  Will her husband take her to the steak house in her new threads?

Not on your life.

Marx TV Tennis [1977]

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It wasn’t actually a TV, but it provided hours of entertainment for the stunning Mrs. BelRedRoad and her brother.

The Marx TV Tennis game was released in 1975, as a completely mechanical version of the game Pong. The “ball” is actually an illuminated flashlight bulb connected by long rubber springs to the player’s control knobs.

This was a Christmas gift from their Mom in 1977.  Cost: $34.95 plus tax.  While the TV Tennis game itself is long gone, the box has been kicking around our garage now for as long as I can remember – holding various family stuff like toys and such.  But that too had to end, when the box started to fall apart. Before recycling it, I did the right thing and scanned all the artwork.

Enjoy the colors and the retro-tech!

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An interactive game run by a series of rubber bands and plastic gears?  Choke on that, Android App 🙂

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The above picture was the entire side of the box.  To present it here, I had to to six different scans on my flatbed scanner and then stitch them together in Windows Live Photo Gallery.

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The game was shipped to – and purchased from – Lake Hills Toys in Bellevue WA.  While the Sixties-era strip mall still exists, the store is gone.

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Introducing The Big Wheels, the neighborhood gang who found TV Tennis to be the most amazing thing to ever hit the unfinished basements of suburbia.  Jeffrey exemplifies the insecure kid in the neighborhood who only had friends because he put on an air of intelligence.  He got beat up a lot. I have no idea what Wendy is talking about, since the most successful multi-tasking I’ve seen comes from Mrs. BelRedRoad.  Daniel, you’re 7.  Why on Earth would you watch real Tennis on TV?  Oh yeah…Chris Evert.  Noodles grew up to be high-powered track coach.

Shrimp is on the most epic riding toy. Ever.

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