Posts tagged ‘bon appetit magazine’

Telly Savalas – Bringin’ Home The Chicken. Baby.

Telly Savalas was a Man’s Man.  Some say he was The Man. It helped that he played one on TV.

No matter how he’s viewed by the masses, Telly cut profile like no other in the history of entertainment.  His voice – to those of us who grew up in 1970s – is immediately recognizable. His tough/cool attitude lent itself to a unique way in every role he played.  He single-handedly made lollipops and pork pie hats cool.  From 007 Bad Guy to NYPD Good Guy, Telly did it all.

And he loved to cook.

Telly Savalas' Swingin' Trailer Pad

Bon Appetit magazine interviewed Telly Savalas for their January 1978 issue, while he was on location filming for his series Kojak. The interview was rich with his opinions on entertainment, stories of family, and wild tales dinners out in foreign countries with the likes of Rod Steiger and Peter Ustinov.  For him, dinner time was a family affair surrounded by friends and relatives. He loved all the basics: meat, fruit, and vegetables – done with a Mediterranean flare.

Telly Savalas Cooking

There’s something to be said for a guy who could cook, act, and had kids old enough to be the parents to his other kids.  Telly was confident, strong, unique, and like no one who has graced the screen since he left us for the Great Squad Room in the sky.  May he Rest In Peace.

Baby.

Future Sugar Fiend

Kitchen Aid Ad

One of each please 🙂

It starts off innocently with an Easy Bake oven.

You learn how to cook with a lightbulb, only to realize that the portions just aren’t big enough.  Soon, you move to cooking snacks with Mom on the big stove.  Next you start looking at the mixes and sneaking in a baking session or two as a latch-key kid before Mom and Dad get home.

You buy your first cake mix at 13.

Eventually you discover that you know more about cooking than the Home-Ec teacher, and are now able to whip out perfect cakes, pies, cookies and such with ease.  You’re up until all hours of the night, perfecting the mixes with your own ingredients.  The angel food cakes need more bounce, and the muffins simply don’t have that certain secret nuance.

You spend your Fridays at restaurants, taking pictures of dessert.  Your Saturdays are devoted to recreating them in your special way.

Face it: You probably started like Little Shelly Sugar in this ad, with a love for sweets and kitchen fortified by your Mom’s hard-core appliances.  Chances are you have a few of them still, gracefully draped in brown or avocado green.  Your friends may chuckle at the colors, until they taste your desserts.

It’s okay, because we need you to make our lives sweeter 🙂

Kitchen Aid Ad

Bon Appetit Magazine - January 1978

Meatza – Easy, Nutritious, Attractive?

Meatza

This gem of culinary shellshock skill and mastery comes from the June 1976 issue of Bon Appetit magazine.

Yes that’s a pizza crust made from meatloaf.  Yes those are pitted avocado halves, swimming happy and care-free in a viscid hot pool of cheddar cheese sauce.  Parsley and tomatoes are perched atop the steaming dinner pile to make it healthy.  I reserve the right to love the bacon. In an epic spin on “make some food look like something else,” this recipe uses rib-sticking hand-processed meat product to create an equally unhealthy comfort food.  I would have never considered mimicking one from the other.  But when strapped for time in the Seventies, innovation it seems came out in shades of green and brown. And topped with avocados.

“Consider the Avocado Meatza,” Bon Appetit writes, “an Americanized version of pizza.”

The method for making this quick, hearty meal starts off much like meat loaf. Instead of being baked in a loaf pan, however, the mixture gets patted out like a pie shell on a baking sheet, and coolking time is cut to a fraction. Most meat loaves required at least an hour; the Meatza takes 20 minutes.

Undiluted cheddar cheese soup goes atop the half-baked meat; avocado slices and bacon alternate pinwheel fashion over this sauce. Cherry tomato halves circle the edge and the colorfully garnished dish goes back into the oven for another 10 minutes.

Easy, nutritious, and attractive.

I’m thinking “Easy” is the only truthful claim.

I will admit that it does have a certain allure. I can’t stop looking at it, like the shapeless form at the base of a tall building that I know at one time walked upright. Like the nose of a train that took out a cow on the Great Plains. Like any recipe that uses Vegetable Jell-O. Incidentally, when I was transcribing this from the magazine, I mis-spelled meatloaf as meatload.

Either one would be accurate.

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