Posts tagged ‘cars’

Wicked Street Machines of The 1970s

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If you’re a gear head like me, you can’t get cars out of the blood.

For me the most notable “period of influence” for anything automotive was the 1970s; it was when I started building models.  It was when I started drawing customs.  It was when I bought my first car.  I am still in love with the long lines and thirsty engines that once pounded the streets of Seattle – announced with Cherry Bombs or Sidepipes and rolling on mags with back ends jacked up to the sky.

It would take years of therapy to strip that image from my mind, so I don’t even try.

Recently on Tumblr I came across a blog that celebrates that era through personal photos submitted by its readers.  70sStreetMachines is an archive of custom awesomeness, with the stripes, the paint, the spoilers, and the wheels which point to a decade of driving where America lived by “Anything Goes.”  There is no short trip to this blog!  I found myself stuck in a loop of viewing picture after picture, remembering what it was like to be 12 to 14 years old and wishing I was old enough to own effectively anything there.

Visit and Enjoy!

http://70sstreetmachines.tumblr.com/

Shiny New Cadillacs [1966}

These are from the era “when Giant Cars ruled the Earth.” I see a white Coupe deVille in the back, and a pair of Fleetwoods. With all that floor-to-ceiling glass and shiny chrome, that is MY kind of dealership!


Scan courtesy of X-Ray Delta One on Flickr

Barracuda!

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By far one of the finer offerings of the late 1960s was the Plymouth Barracuda.

Considered a small car by Sixties standards, the “Cuda was part of what came to be known as “The Pony Car Movement.”  The name was derived from its competitive relationship with the Ford Mustang, but in reality the Barracuda had been on the market before the Mustang was introduced in mid-1964.

The final model hit the street in 1974.

The Barracuda came with 6-cylinder or V8 engines.  Large motors were available in special packages, which made the car meaner and faster.  While Plymouth as a car make is no more, there is talk about the next Chrysler super car to be based on the famous `Cuda name.

Photo courtesy Wikipedia

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Photo courtesy Tom Hardin – 1983

1968 Plymouth Barracuda 2-Door Fastback (1 of 6)

Photo by Randy von Liski

Texas Service Station [1965]

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Courtesy Southern Methodist University, Central University Libraries, DeGolyer Library

Trust your car to the man who wears the star!

Straight from the archives of Southern Methodist University, this photo is of a new Texaco service station outside of Houston TX – taken by Robert Yarnall Richie in 1965.  Richie was a noted commercial photographer, who took pictures for large businesses around the US.  He died in 1984.

The station is designed in the “Mid-Century” style, with its flat roof and jaunty positive feeling.  It would be a fairly new structure, based on the size of the trees surrounding the property.  That’s a `65 Ford Custom sedan in front of the fetching green-topped building.  There is also a `64 Ford Galaxie inside the station getting service.  At the pumps: a `65 Mustang fastback, a `65 Buick Electra, and `64 Ford pickup.

The Wide-Track `67 Pontiac

1966 Pontiac Bonneville - May 1972 [Public Domain]

I will freely admit to being a gear head.

In fact, I have a thing for big Sixties full-sized passenger vehicles; my first car was a 1960 Buick LeSabre.  Even my second car was big – a clapped-out `65 Impala.  That said, I would have absolutely no trouble in owning today’s featured vessel: The “Wide-Track” 1967 Pontiac.

1967 Pontiac Bonneville

Photo courtesy of Rob Hartog

Stylish and huge, the Catalina, Ventura, and Bonneville models all had “stacked headlights” and and bumpers integrated with the lines of the car.  Engine choices were “Huge” and “More Huge.”  Driving one of these was like a dream; with its quintessential American stance and smooth settings on the suspension, they excelled in straight-line driving and road trips – giving up some ability in the corners.

1967 Pontiac Bonneville

Photo courtesy of Walt Woodruff

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Photo courtesy of RaysnCayne

DM-08-36  Pontiac Bonneville [1967]

Photo courtesy of Bram Visser

Art Fitzpatrick penned a large number of automotive ads during his successful art career, including many of them for Pontiac.  His jaunty upbeat take on the full-sized GM products of the 1960s is now legendary.  Some of those ads – depicting the `67 Pontiac – are shown below, and others can be seen here.

Yesterday's Ride ~ 1967 Pontiac Bonneville

Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

1967 Pontiac Station Wagons

1967 Pontiac Bonneville Wide-Track

Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

1967 Pontiac Bonneville Ad

Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

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Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

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Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

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Artwork by Art Fitzpatrick / Owen Jones & Partners LTD

Seattle City Light: Radio Dispatched to Alki [1968]

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“Come in, Truck 82…”

A Seattle City Light service truck makes a visit to a view home in Seattle’s Alki neighborhood in 1968.  The serviceman is wearing his lab coat and white service hat.  Back in the days before cellphones, he would have been sent there by a gruff-sounding dispatcher barking over the dash-mounted Motorola radio in the vehicle.  The Range Service Truck: A mid-1960s Chevrolet van – like this one – done in Utility Yellow.  In the garage: A 1959 Ford Galaxie convertible.

Built in 1954, this “Mid-Century” home design is common in neighborhoods and suburbs surrounding Seattle:

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The roof line and brown on the siding in the first picture are nearly identical to my suburban house – which was built in the late 1960s.  Today that Alki house still stands, now with garage doors on the car port, and frankly still possessing a tremendous view:

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And the radio-dispatched yellow van?  Most likely retired and scrapped.

Beret in The Barrio [1967]

From the camera lens of James Jowers, this photo captures a very urban neighborhood scene in New York City.  The man in the beret is sitting on a `57 Chevrolet, while there is a `59 Chevy across the street.  Jowers shot a series of NYC photos at an important time in US history – the 1960s.  Check out a collection of his work here on Flickr.

Jowers’ pictures and copyrights from this period were donated to The Eastman House in 2007.

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