Posts tagged ‘clothing’

Fashion Ahoy!! [1974]

Fashion Ahoy!! [1974] #sailfish #dress #florida #style #fashion #oldgoldfiltered #filmisnotdead

There is no end to the gems which unearth themselves from the Florida archives!

As it always seems to be, this 1974 fashion shot from Roy Erickson caught my eye as I was searching for something else.  That is one happy Sailfish, with small waves below it to soften its massive leap across her skirt.  The material in her dress appears to be identical to some of the shirts I wore during Junior High – slick, shiny and snaggy.  I’m sure there’s a name for it, but the word escapes me right now.

We can just call it “Disco Denim.”

Swingin’ Simplicity [1973]

Simplicity 5628

While I was familiar with this style from my youth, I never knew the name.

After the stunning Mrs. BelRedRoad found this vintage 1973 pattern at a thrift store, I discovered it’s called a caftan.  In the past it was considered an garment to be worn over other garments.  By the 1970s, a caftan had come into its own as a single dress – worn in a multitude of styles, and undergarments optional.  Popular with musicians, hippies – and Elizabeth Taylor – the fashion trend symbolized freedom and a free spirited life. presumably shapeless,  the dress design manages to hang in a very distinctive way – flowing and soft.

The style endures to this day in both its original overgarment form, or as a stylish dress or throw made in silk or soft materials.

Caftan Dresses

Homedale School Grade 8 home economics class fashion show, 1977

Home Ec Fashion Show, 1977 – Courtesy Elgin County Archives

M0006955

Elizabeth Taylor, 1972 – Scan from Patrick Peccatte

Caftans

My sisters in their caftans – Summer 1973

Quilting Overload Caftan 1973

Quilting Overload Caftan 2 1973


Also See: Maxi Dresses
Maxi-Knit

Christmas Party [1952]

Photo courtesy of Seattle Municipal Archives

Photo courtesy of Seattle Municipal Archives

Straight from the City of Seattle file cabinets comes this gem of vintage holiday goodness!

The bare tree in the background says it all: It’s Christmas in the Public Sector. Look at the executives in suits, men in working linemen attire and “the office girl” in her stylish skirt and blouse; they’re just having a good time over coffee and cookies.  No doubt there’s ashtrays on those tables, filled with stubbed-out Pall Malls.

Hard to believe this picture is sixty years old! For more vintage public awesomeness, check out their photostream on Flickr.

Knit Maxi Dress [1973]

Maxi-Knit

Long dresses have come back into style recently.  A quick search of the term “maxi dress” comes up with near-countless stores offering the long lengths in many styles and colors.  Thankfully, the cut and fabric is now much better than it was the last time such dresses were popular.

And thankfully, knitting your maxi dress is no longer necessary.

This gem was found in the Fall/Winter 1973-74 issue of McCall’s Needlework & Crafts. With her slippers and really old book, the model is settling in for a night of badly-lit reading.  Or entertaining Aunt Flo.  The plunging knit neckline dares to call out that she is kind of young, kind of now – “Charlie!” The iron cauldron above the hearth is locked down once more, cleaned and dried after the last initiation.  The hard-wood rocking chair is sure to create unparalleled back spasms after 45 minutes – time enough to get through the first chapter and grab a hot toddy.

Knit in a base of green, her wearable couch throw is adorned in the whimsical colors of a candy box.

This mating can only come from a decade which already represents so many of our styling debacles.  The gold about her neck shines against the spotlights above her kitchen counter, and snags the yarn with ease.  Lapels a-plenty are a classy accessory, certainly shiny and stretchy in a way only polyester can move.  Her makeup and hair are done to the final detail, telling her man that this book can be laid down and her matching coat is waiting in the hall closet.  Are the colors of this maxi dress Christmas-like?  Maybe.  Is the maxi dress warm?  Probably, to the point that the fire at her back is probably making her itch.  Will her husband take her to the steak house in her new threads?

Not on your life.

Sue Murray [1967]

Sue Murray By David Bailey (1967)

[Photo by David Bailey]

One thing I’ve learned, while skimming through the archives of the world for Wall Of Retro goodies, is that style and fashion can be cyclical.

What we saw decades ago can come back and grace the catwalk once again.  In a sense we could expect that style will repeat itself, given that many other things in life cycle through too – like recessions or political parties in charge of the government.  Yes, there are road bumps in style (I’m talking to you, Parachute Pants).  But fashion is often updated with better cuts and materials to intrigue yet another generation.

Or in the case of Sue Murray, style of any cut is flat out timeless.

As a member of the Swinging London fashion elite, Sue graced magazine covers and photo spreads throughout the 1960s and 1970s.  Her look appeared to be effortless and classic – rich with intriguing facial expressions, angled poses, and cheek bones which picked up shadows like those of a Greek goddess.  Shown in almost any wardrobe from the 1960s, she looks as amazing in those archive photos today as she did back then.  The fashion of the era appears fresh on her, even though the photos were taken over four decades ago.

Perusing the Intertubes, I’m not able to find a decent Bio on her – other than the fact that she was born in 1946.

Unlike her contemporary counterpart Jean Shrimpton – who walked away from modeling and has been living happily outside of the industry – Sue Murray has become a bit of an modern anamoly to me. We’ll let these three photos by David Bailey speak for themselves.

Fabiani

[Photo by David Bailey]

Mary Quant

[Photo by David Bailey]

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Sue Murray Links:

We Heart Vintage

I Am The Child Of The Moon

Schelay

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