Posts tagged ‘commercial’

Fill It To The Rim…With BRIM! [1970]

1970-12-11 Life P020 by Wishbook
1970-12-11 Life P020, a photo by Wishbook on Flickr.

Sundays after church in the 1970s smelled like black coffee and sugar cookies. Brim figures heavily into this memory!

Quiet Riot’s “Metal Health” From 1983 Gets Its Due Attention In 2013

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Lately I’ve been digitizing some songs from my record collection, pulling sources from albums I’ve had for decades – or ones that I’ve found at thrift stores over the years. It’s pretty hard to pass up a 99-cent copy of Herb Alpert, Sergio Mendes, Sarah Vaughan, or Henry Mancini, when you still have a working record player. I mean, seriously…single MP3 tracks off Amazon or Apple cost that, and only if that vintage track is available at all. I can get the whole album for the same price?

Here’s my dollar, Ms. Cashier.

Plus of course, there is the argument over the “warmth” of listening to analog recordings from vinyl. Frankly my ear isn’t well tuned enough to hear anything shrill in digital remasters. I will say this: there is a familiarity to hearing the “clicks and pops” of a record, something tangible and tactile on a turntable playing a song for me through a vinyl track of glory.

Life isn’t perfect, and therefore the soundtrack to life shouldn’t necessarily demand perfection.

Last night I was putting away canned goods in the pantry when I spied a box of records that hadn’t been touched in a while. Taking a quick look inside exposed a few items I had owned since the 1980s, along with some other items given to me by friends when they gave away their record player in the early 1990s. One of those albums is the one you see here: Metal Health by Quiet Riot.

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Of course there’s nothing quiet about it; Metal Health was standard-issue early-80s rock, courtesy of the blaring-yet-powerful high-pitched vocals of Kevin DuBrow, mixed with the hook-heavy guitar solos of Carlos Cavazo and solid backing by Frankie Banali and Rudy Sarzo. Since its release in 1983, the album has sold over 6 million copies. Quiet Riot was a seasoned crew of performers by this time, having been together for a decade. They played many of the same venues as Van Halen during the 1970s. While not achieving the same notoriety as other L.A. rock bands of the era, they continued to play until 2007, when singer DuBrow was found dead of a cocaine overdose at his home. They reformed in 2010; none of the original early-70s line up remains.

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On my copy of the album the first track is titled “Metal Health,” which according to resources makes it part of the first release. On subsequent releases of the album, the track was retitled as “Bang Your Head (Metal Health)” – which is what most people called it anyway. Much like The Who’s Baba O’Riley being called “Teenage Wasteland” by most of the listening public.

Metal Health is considered widely to be Quiet Riot’s largest hit and, thanks to the 2013 Superbowl, has seen a worthy tribute 30 years later as part of a really funny Hyundai commercial – the two versions of which are posted below:

And if you’re itching to hear the original song in its epic entirety, here’s the track I digitized from my LP version. All Hail Vinyl!

Farrah Fawcett Commercial for Mercury [1975]

There’s no denying that she ushered in an amazing era for hair.

Farrah Fawcett was well known in the 1970s for her glorious blond mane, cut and styled to look like a natural flow – but likely requiring over an hour of primping and care to look that way.  No matter: The hair was amazing, and she was beautiful even without it.

I came across this one-minute spot for Mercury Cougar from 1975, starring Farrah and the traditional big cat.  The car is the least noteworthy thing in the commercial, being a typical malaise-era Ford product – “wrapped in glove-soft vinyl,” equipped with an emissions-choked V8 engine giving dismal MPG, and offering dubious overall quality control.  But for this brief minute – with Farrah driving – the Cougar XR-7 is a Chariot to The Goddess.

Rest In Peace Farrah.

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Photo courtesy of Rob Hartog

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