Posts tagged ‘flickr’

Old Gold Filtered

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A couple months ago I realized that Instagram has become a heavily-used venue for many types of visual communication.  People are taking photos with their phones of anything and everything. They filter them to look cool. Others are uploading photos to their phones from their DSLRs and film cameras to share, because IG can only be posted from a mobile device.  Instagram has even added video options now. I the 15 months I’ve had an account there, more people have responded to my posts than most other places. As human beings we are suckers for the Likes, Loves, or Faves we get online from sites like Facebook, Eyeem, Streamzoo, Trover, Foursquare, Foodspotting, Twitter, or IG. It’s nice to know that people are looking at, and enjoying, the things we offer up to The Intertubes.

In all of this, I realized that a medium like Instagram could also be a venue for sharing older extra-awesome film photos.

Lone Australian Soldier on Watch, El Alamein Egypt [1914]

Let’s face it: The world around us was captured long before the iPhone existed.  The evidence is there, sometimes buried in the back of a drawer or languishing in a box on a garage shelf.  There may not have been as many pictures of cats or food back then, but life was captured nonetheless.  There are billions of photos, negatives, plates and slides out there, waiting to be discovered and shared with the world.  Some people thrive on finding old prints in thrift stores or antique malls. One man is setting out to retrieve and save millions of film photos and negatives from illegal dumps in China. For me it as easy as grabbing pictures from the family archives, or visiting The Commons at Flickr.

And from this treasure trove I created Old Gold Filtered using Instragram.

General Rodriguez

My goal was simple: Highlight cool shots from 30 years ago and back that are okay for me to use – Public Domain, Creative Commons, or my own stash.  The subject matter can capture the rich and the varied; some days I will post a portrait while others will be a structure or an airplane.  Occasionally there’s a cute kid or critter. Anything that catches my eye might end up with an #oldgoldfiltered tag.

The other day I posted a picture I took of Downtown Seattle from a helicopter in 1975:

The Kingdome and Downtown Seattle [1975]

No long after it was picked up by someone and posted to Reddit. Within 24 hours it had over 10,000 views on Flickr. Why on earth would like little 600-pixel square photo have such an impact? I think it’s because many people love looking into the past, to appreciate the comparison/constrast with today’s world. There is also the notion that good style and composition are timeless accessories to any subject. The fact that a simple image can evoke and extract emotion is a beautiful thing. No words, just the visual to give a message of hope, love, laughter, sadness, humor, or community. And putting that kind of yesterday on IG just seems natural to me now.

Currently the newest picture is a personal photo from 1981, showing friend Jeff and I standing in front of his 1972 Chevy Nova:

Super Sport

And the oldest? A very spooky one from 1865 by noted 19th Century photographer Julia Margaret Cameron:

Sad Flowers

Check out the entire Old Gold Filtered collection on Flickr!

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Fill It To The Rim…With BRIM! [1970]

1970-12-11 Life P020 by Wishbook
1970-12-11 Life P020, a photo by Wishbook on Flickr.

Sundays after church in the 1970s smelled like black coffee and sugar cookies. Brim figures heavily into this memory!

Mini Bike! [1973]

what liz knowz

I can’t even begin to describe how much I wanted one of these back in the day.

In the late 1970s and early 80s I delivered newspapers using my trusty Rampar BMX bike. One day a friend let me borrow a hot-wired Honda CT70 that was sitting at his house; I used it on the paper route – without helmet, license, or even valid registration – and was hopelessly hooked. It was compact, quick, light, and did a great job of hauling the paper cart. The bike also got close to 100 mpg under my 140 pound frame. Eventually the owner reclaimed his property, and I was back on my BMX. I wanted a CT70 badly, but could never put the $700 together for a new one.

Eventually I became a motorcycle rider, probably in part to my experience with this mini bike.

This picture – courtesy of Signs And Wonders – was found as you see it, complete with cryptic “WHAT LIZ KNOWZ” message.  All the great elements are there: kid in plaid, Mom in helmet, and CT70 on lawn.  Love love love!

Found Photos from New York [1963-64]

Feb. 2, 1963 New York, 42 Street a

Susan Healey got bitten by the old camera bug.

It’s an addictive habit; old cameras come in so many shapes and sizes, plus many of them still work.  In my world, people give me film cameras because they have moved completely to digital.  If anything, they are cool to look at even if they don’t work (case in point is this Canon AL-1, which doesn’t power up).  Sometimes it’s nice to have a collection for comparison purposes, and there are plenty of clubs around the US that still provide a camera nut with plenty to see.

To feed her addiction to cameras, Susan spends a lot of time at camera swap meets and events. “I discovered the Photographic Historical Society of New England a few years ago,” she said in an email, “and a couple of times a year they have a big event called Photographica.”

Like other types of swap meets, people come from all over the place to buy and sell cameras, film and other photographic equipment. On one occasion, she found more than cameras at a table.  “One of the vendors had a few piles of old photos,” Susan explained. “When I saw them I couldn’t believe they hadn’t been snatched up yet.

For about $5.00, they were mine.”

I agree with Susan’s description of these photos as “an amazing glimpse of well-known areas and time.” The signage, the cars, and the buildings are all so perfectly preserved in photographic form that it’s almost as if we are pulled right into the scenes. And the people in the photos also are very stylish; the cut of the clothing they’re wearing is clearly money, and the care each has taken to be presentable – save one photo – is very obvious. I know it would be corny to mention Mad Men at this point, but I am truly reminded of that hit series when looking at these photos.

Susan’s take on the collection is heart-felt.

“Every time I go (to the swap meets), I look through the old photos but have never found anything that moved me as much as these ones did.”

I totally agree. The photos are truly a hashmark on the map of time.  The colors, while a bit faded, are very accurate for the era.  It helps that the pictures are clear, and that the photographer seems to be good at what she/he did.  Check out each photo below; they range from big city scenes to snowy rural backgrounds – with stylish 60s beach photos sure to peak some interest in the the folks over at We Heart Vintage.  Click on any of the pictures to go see more info about them on Flickr.

Enjoy!

Aug. 3, 1963

1960s halter tops left nothing to imagine.  Gotta admit she’s pretty ripped for being in the 1960s. That’s a 1960 Ford Galaxie behind her.

Aug. 3,1963

One has to wonder if they ever got all of that into the little red Corvair!

Dec.1963

Love the old Texaco sign.  Same Corvair from above appears to be making an encore appearance in the background.

December 1963

Umm…is he peeing in the snow?  Next to the Corvair?

Feb. 17, 1963 Time Square NY

New York City, 42nd Street – Dodge Lancer speeds past an old Buick on the left and a yellow 1963 Chev Bel-Air taxi on the right.

Feb.  2, 1963 New York Broadway

Feb. 2, 1963 New York, 42 Street

1962 Chev Bel-Air taxi speeds through intersection, followed by an Oldsmobile and Thunderbird.

Feb. 2, 1963 Empire State Building

Empire State Building

April 12, 1963 Castkill

Bridge to the Catskills.

July 4, 1963 Big Beach  P. Jeff

They look like a Chet and a Burl.  I’m kinda impressed that that they don’t have floppy double-martini 60s bodies.

July 5, 1963 P.J.

Chet and Burl’s chicks.

Aug. 1963

What a trio; they are so stylish!  This shot alone made the five-dollars Susan paid for the whole album worth the purchase.

Jan 30, 1963 155 Park Ave, Lyndhurst

Oct. 12, 1963 Jency Ln Pency ln

March 1964

The Whitehouse

April 12, 1963 Suffern

Suffern NY – 1963.  That’s a righteous Dodge or Plymouth.

Apr. 13, 1963

Studebaker at the pump!  Bonus points for the `55 Ford on the right.

Father-In-Law was a Cool Traveler in `64

Recently a bag of slides appeared in the mail from my wife’s aunt. The note said, “Thought you might like these slides from Grandmother’s collection. I’ve had these for several years!” The bag was truly a treasure trove of memories, depicting my wife’s parent in their twenties around the time that she was born.

Best of all, many of them were Kodachrome and still had the rich colors the media type was known for.

This slide was taken somewhere in Oregon or Washington, while the wife’s family was on a camping trip. She would have been just a month old at that point. The car – possibly a 1962 Pontiac – was owned by her grandparents. The Security Traveler “canned ham” trailer: pure Sixties righteousness. My father-in-law, ever thin as he is today, takes a drag off his Marlboro and looks pensively into his Dad’s camera. I love the design in his shirt, and the pencil-thin pants.  The clothes and the stance depict the essence of cool.  While he no longer smokes, to this day he stands in the same way.

And so does my brother-in-law!

Snazzy Threads from The Forties!

[Portrait of Frank Sinatra, Liederkrantz Hall, New York, N.Y., ca. 1947] (LOC)

Frank Sinatra, Liederkrantz Hall, NYC - Circa 1947

Style: Some have it, and others are like me – complete void of any trace.  It’s a blend of taste and smarts that brings it out.  For the lucky few, style is effortless – natural like breathing air.  But for many, it’s a sure bet that the clothes combo picked out in the morning would made a stylist laugh.

But in the 1940s it seemed as if everyone had style, especially musicians.

The United States’ Library Of Congress has an entire collection of photographs taken by William Gottlieb in the 1940s, highlighting the stars of Jazz.  By looking through the 1600 photos in the collection, it’s pretty clear that part of being a jazz musician in that era meant dressing sharp.  The suits were cut with flair, and the dresses also hugged a curve or two.  Ties had character.  Everything was shiny, pin striped, or accessorized to the stratosphere.   It was definitely a time when people cared about how they looked, instead of an era for some that my mother-in-law describes as “Looking like you’re doing yard work.”

In the 21st Century many of us – well mostly me anyway – could learn a lot about what to wear, simply by going through these photos.

Enjoy!

[Portrait of Doris Day and Kitty Kallen, Central Park, New York, N.Y., ca. Apr. 1947] (LOC)

Doris Day and Kitty Kallen, Central Park, NYC, ca. Apr. 1947

[Portrait of Chico Alvarez and June Christy, 1947 or 1948] (LOC)

Chico Alvarez and June Christy, ca. 1947

[Portrait of Irving Kolodin, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948] (LOC)

Irving Kolodin, NYC, between 1946 and 1948

[Portrait of Dottie Reid, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948] (LOC)

Dottie Reid, NYC, between 1946 and 1948

[Portrait of George Wettling, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948] (LOC)

George Wettling, NYC, between 1946 and 1948

[Portrait of Imogene Coca, Mary Lou Williams, and Ann Hathaway, between 1938 and 1948] (LOC)

Imogene Coca, Mary Lou Williams, and Ann Hathaway

[Portrait of Fran Warren and Gene Williams, Hotel Pennsylvania(?), New York, N.Y., ca. Oct. 1947] (LOC)

Fran Warren and Gene Williams, NYC, ca. Oct. 1947

[Portrait of Eddie Condon, Eddie Condon's, New York, N.Y., ca. Oct. 1946] (LOC)

Eddie Condon, NYC, ca. Oct. 1946

[Portrait of Joan Brooks and Duke Niles, New York, N.Y., ca. Apr. 1947] (LOC)

Joan Brooks and Duke Niles, ca. Apr. 1947

[Portrait of Thelonious Monk, Minton's Playhouse, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947] (LOC)

Thelonious Monk, Minton's Playhouse, NYC, ca. Sept. 1947

 

[Portrait of Sarah Vaughan, Café Society (Downtown), New York, N.Y., ca. Aug. 1946] (LOC)

Sarah Vaughan, Café Society, NYC, ca. Aug. 1946

[Portrait of Stan Kenton and Eddie Safranski, 1947 or 1948] (LOC)

Stan Kenton and Eddie Safranski, 1947 or 1948

[Portrait of June Christy and Red Rodney, Club Troubadour, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1947] (LOC)

June Christy and Red Rodney, Club Troubadour, NYC, ca. Sept. 1947

[Portrait of Earl Hines, New York, N.Y., ca. Mar. 1947] (LOC)

Earl Hines, NYC, ca. Mar. 1947

[Portrait of Ann Hathaway, Washington Square, New York, N.Y., ca. May 1947] (LOC)

Ann Hathaway, Washington Square, NYC, ca. May 1947

[Portrait of Joe Marsala, William P. Gottlieb's home or office, New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947] (LOC)

Joe Marsala, ca. June 1947

[Portrait of Louis Prima, New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947] (LOC)

Louis Prima, NYC, ca. June 1947

[Portrait of Sylvia Syms, Little Casino(?), New York, N.Y., ca. June 1947] (LOC)

Sylvia Syms, ca. June 1947

Tube Socks and Urethane

97-078

Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

Steve Lundeen has the monumental – and voluntary – task of archiving his late father-in-law’s photographs.  After all, the man he is preserving on the Internet through Flickr took thousands upon thousand of photos.

Nick DeWolf was a scientist, dreamer, and voracious photographer who documented the world around him – pretty much for the heck  of it – from the 1950s until his death in 2006.   As of this writing, Steve had scanned and posted over 52,000 of Nick’s photos.  His scenes were of everything: people, buildings, cars, landscapes, boats, and tons throughout North America.  He had an eye for reality; rather than capturing what a marketing firm wanted the viewer to remember of the time, Nick had the ability to save the real world.  He saw the warmth of life and somehow harnessed it on film.  While the photos here are clearly from the late 1970s, the subject matter doesn’t look so out of date that it makes the viewer laugh.  Nick’s gift seemed to come from stealth, a long lens, and knowing where to put his subject almost without looking.

The pictures depicted here are only a few of his shots from an unnamed skateboarding championship that occurred in Aspen Colorado during the summer of 1977.  The colors are beautiful.  The subject matter so very 70s.  There are over 100 photos from the meet in Nick’s Roll # 97, compiled with others from a backyard trampoline party and a horse show.  All told, there are nearly 900 photos in that collection alone.

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Photo Credit: Nick DeWolf

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Nick Dewolf’s Aspen Roll, 1977 – reel #97

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